To ensure the Law Professional Practicum meets the needs of member universities and has rigorous academic standards, ACICIS has convened an Advisory Panel to assist with the development of the LPP. The panel, chaired by ACICIS Consortium Director, Professor David T Hill AM, is composed of qualified academics and relevant personnel from a range of ACICIS member universities.

The following academics are members of the ACICIS Law Professional Practicum Advisory Panel. ACICIS would like to thank them for their contribution to the program.

Professor David T Hill AM

Professor David T Hill AM, ACICIS Consortium Director and Founder will participate as the chair of the PHST Advisory Panel. Recently retired after 25 years at Murdoch University, where Professor Hill was the Chair of Southeast Asian Studies since 1999. Professor Hill continues his involvement as Emeritus Professor of Southeast Asian Studies and Fellow the Asia Research Centre for Social, Political and Economic Change.

Dr Melissa Crouch

Dr Melissa Crouch is a Senior Lecturer at the Law Faculty, the University of New South Wales, Sydney. Her research contributes to the field of Asian Legal Studies, with a concentration on Constitutional Change, Law and Development, and Law and Religion. Her research focuses geographically on Southeast Asia, particularly Indonesia and Myanmar. Melissa is the author of  Law and Religion in Indonesia: Conflict and the Courts in West Java (Routledge, 2014). She is also the editor of several volumes: Law, Society and Transition in Myanmar (2014);  ‘Islam and the State in Myanmar: Muslim-Buddhist Relations and the Politics of Belonging‘ (OUP 2016), and The Business of Transition: Law, Development and Economics in Myanmar (CUP, forthcoming 2017). Melissa has been invited to contribute to numerous initiatives on constitutional and legal reform in Myanmar. She is currently leading a team on a major project on professional legal education in corporate and commercial law for judges, lawyers, and law officers in Myanmar.

Melissa teaches in the areas of constitutional law, administrative law, comparative law, law and development, and Asian legal systems. At UNSW, she teaches Principles of Public Law, and two elective courses: Islamic Law and Society; and Rule of Law in Southeast Asia. Melissa is the Southeast Asia Engagement Liaison at UNSW Law

Dr Petra Mahy

Dr Petra Mahy is currently a Lecturer in Law at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Previously she has been employed at the University of Oxford, the University of Melbourne and Monash University. She holds a PhD in anthropology from the Australian National University. At SOAS, Petra teaches a variety of subjects on comparative law, comparative corporate law and the legal systems of Asia and Africa. Petra has been visiting Indonesia since she was teenager, including spending a year as an AFS exchange student in Banda Aceh (1997-1998), another year on the ACICIS program in Yogyakarta (2002) and completing her PhD fieldwork in East Kalimantan (2007). Her current research interests include comparative colonial and postcolonial legal systems in Southeast Asia and the interactions between formal labour law and informal norms in Indonesia

Dr Jeremy Kingsley

Dr Jeremy Kingsley is a legal scholar and anthropologist of Indonesia. He is a Senior Lecturer at Swinburne Law School, Melbourne, Australia.

As a lawyer who blends anthropology into his scholarship this brings an interdisciplinary academic approach to his work. Jeremy received his LLM and PhD degrees in Law at the University of Melbourne and his BA and LLB from Deakin University. His research focuses primarily upon religious and political authority in Indonesia and how this affects local governance. Jeremy is currently undertaking a research project tentatively entitled: “Inter-Asian Legalities” at the Swinburne Law School.

Jeremy has completed a two-year Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Asia Research Institute, been a Senior Research Fellow at the Middle East Institute and lectured at Tembusu College, all at National University of Singapore (NUS). Jeremy has undertaken extensive field research primarily on the eastern Indonesian island of Lombok, as well as in Jakarta, Dubai and Morocco. His work has been published in academic and public affairs journals.

Dr Susannah Sage-Jacobson

Dr Susannah Sage-Jacobson is a Senior Lecturer at Flinders Law School where she teaches Australian Administrative Law and acts as a supervising solicitor in the Flinders Clinical program. Susannah is also the Topic Coordinator for undergraduate law electives in Disability and Mental Health Law and she leads the Indonesia Study Tour accredited to the Flinders Law Degree.

Susannah has an active interest in internationalising the Australian Law Curriculum demonstrated through both her engagement with international students at the Law School and the Flinders Legal Advice Clinic and by leading Flinders Law School’s off-shore mobility programs in the Asia-Pacific. In 2015 she was the Topic Coordinator of the first Flinders Law Indonesia Tour, in which 30 undergraduate law students spent 3 weeks gaining an introduction to Indonesian Law in partnership with Gadjah Mada Law School in Yogyakarta. Susannah has previous experience working in development in the Asia-Pacific and worked as a consultant for AusAid in legal projects in 2000 and 2002.

Susannah holds a Doctor of Juridical Science (Monash 2009) as well having over 12 years experience as a practicing lawyer across three Australian state jurisdictions. Prior to transition to academia in 2010 Susannah was a Manager at the Public Interest Law Clearing House in Melbourne where she served for 7 years in various roles including as founding coordinator and Principal Solicitor of the Seniors Rights Legal Clinic. Susannah’s primary research interests encompass socio-legal methods and prominently relate to access to civil justice in Australia. She has particular expertise in civil and administrative tribunal decision-making affecting migrants and older people and the experience of these groups in their interactions with the law. Susannah is a co-founding member of the Australian Research Network on Law and Ageing.

Mr Lloyd England

A Monash University Faculty of Law staff member since 2007 as Student Experience Manager and Teaching Associate, Lloyd England commenced his role as a Lecturer – Practice in December 2015 and has been appointed as Co-Convenor of Legal Practice Programs at Monash from 2016. Lloyd is a firm believer in the transformational power of practical placements to enhance traditional tertiary education and prepare students for life post-graduation.

Lloyd has a strong background in legal teaching and delivering student experience initiatives in the space of employability and also researches and publishes in law student health and wellbeing. Lloyd holds a Bachelor of Laws (Hons) from Leicester University, a Postgraduate Diploma of Legal Practice with Commendation from the College of Law of England and Wales, working in the US Capital Markets team of Shearman & Sterling in their London office prior to migrating to Australia. Lloyd also holds a Master of Laws (Intellectual Property) from Monash, registering as Trade Marks Attorney in Australia and New Zealand, prior to commencing with Monash.

Lloyd won the 2009 Law Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence – Sessional Teacher for innovative Torts Law teaching, the Vice Chancellor’s Social Inclusion Award in 2013 for his significant contribution to supporting the university’s commitment to social justice and human rights, and the 2014 Faculty Teaching Award for the unit he developed and teaches, Law in Professional Contexts, bringing law to non-lawyers and the accolades it has achieved. Lloyd has developed this in 2015 into a free online course, bringing free legal literacy to the world and is available to all here.

Mr Paul Govind

Mr Paul Govind is a Lecturer at the Macquarie University School of Law. He teaches Planning Law, International Environmental Law and Comparative Environmental Law in both the undergraduate and postgraduate level. Paul’s research interests focus primarily upon international and domestic climate change law and policy, environmental justice and the intersection of environmental and development law. He is currently a PhD candidate at the Australian National University completing a thesis investigating transformation in the context of adaptation finance. He is also a member of the Centre of Environmental Law at Macquarie University and the Editor of the Australian Journal of Environmental Law published by the Centre.

Associate Professor Eileen Webb

Dr Eileen Webb is an Associate Professor in the Curtin Law School, Curtin University. She is the Director of the Consumer Law Discipline and teaches and researches in real property law, particularly housing and tenancy law, competition and consumer law (including small business law) and elder law.

She has over 50 publications (peer reviewed papers and conference abstracts, research and technical reports) and has been the chief investigator in several funded research projects including Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN): Design and delivery of consumer protection laws and materials in 3 ASEAN nations (with professor Justin Malbon and Dr Tahir Turk).

Eileen has considerable experience in establishing, administering and developing professional practicum programs involving students in legal placements in Western Australia, interstate and overseas.

Professor Simon Butt

Simon Butt studied in Yogyakarta as part of the first ACICIS group in 1995. He is Professor of Indonesian Law at Sydney University, where he teaches and researches a variety of areas of Indonesian law.

Ms Maxine Evers

Ms Maxine Evers is the Associate Dean (Education) in the Faculty of Law at the University of Technology Sydney. Maxine came to academia after more than a decade in legal practice. Maxine’s teaching and research has a focus on the philosophy and practice of ethics, including the connection between legal education and ethics.  She contributes proactively to the legal profession and legal education through her teaching, research and community engagement.

Maxine has served on the NSW Law Society’s Costs Working Committee and the NSW Bar Association’s Professional Conduct Committee. Within the University sector, Maxine’s commitment to legal education and the student experience is reflected in her roles as Director of Students, First Year Experience Coordinator and Student Ombud. Her contribution in these areas is practice-based and collaborative and includes the Good Practice Guide for the TLO (Threshold Learning Outcome) on ‘Ethics and professional responsibility’ (2011, co-authored) and chapters on the ‘Resolution of Student Grievances within Universities’ in Higher Education and the Law (2015, co-authored) and on ‘Resilience and Wellbeing Programs in PLT’ in Promoting Law Student and Lawyer Wellbeing in Australia and Beyond (2016, co-authored).

Dr Joseph Indaimo

After completing his law degree in the 1990s Dr Indaimo practiced law for a small law firm in Perth, WA, Australia, before returning to academia in the early 2000s.  He completed his PhD at the UNSW law school, Sydney, Australia.  In addition to his legal background, Dr Indaimo also has degrees in linguistics and education, and cultural studies.  His research areas include a combination of human rights law, critical legal theory, ethics and jurisprudence.

Returning to Perth, WA, Australia, in 2006 Dr Indaimo was one of the founding team members at the Edith Cowan University law school before joining Murdoch University law school in 2013. At Murdoch, he teaches over a variety of subject areas, include: legal process/introduction to law; legal skills & mooting; international law and human rights.  Since 2015 he has also coordinated the Murdoch University law school’s internship program.